Presbyterians 101 articles

Links

Presbyterians: Who are we?

Questions have been raised about the position of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in comparison to other Reformed bodies. It is always helpful to compare parallel categories.  Sometimes the official positions of one body are compared with a characterization of the other body.  Here are some resources to help anyone to know and understand the actual positions of the PC(USA).

Presbyterian Church history

Portions of the Presbyterian church in the United States have separated from the main body, and some parts have reunited, several times. The greatest division occurred in 1861 during the American Civil War. The two branches created by that division were reunited in 1983 to form the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), currently the largest Presbyterian group in this country.

Theology

Some of the principles articulated by John Calvin remain at the core of Presbyterian beliefs. Among these are the sovereignty of God, the authority of the scripture, justification by grace through faith and the priesthood of all believers. What they mean is that God is the supreme authority throughout the universe. Our knowledge of God and God's purpose for humanity comes from the Bible, particularly what is revealed in the New Testament through the life of Jesus Christ. Our salvation (justification) through Jesus is God's generous gift to us and not the result of our own accomplishments. It is everyone's job — ministers and lay people alike — to share this Good News with the whole world. That is also why the Presbyterian church is governed at all levels by a combination of clergy and laity, men and women alike.

Social Issues

In the 1958 Statement of the PCUA, p. 537: The General Assembly:

Presbyterian Distinctives

Presbyterians are distinctive in two major ways: they adhere to a pattern of religious thought known as Reformed theology and a form of government that stresses the active, representational leadership of both ministers and church members.